Images

  • Jan. 30, 2017

    Broadaxe from Langeid. Museum number C58882/4.

  • Jan. 30, 2017

    Broadaxe from Langeid. Museum number C58882/4.

  • Dec. 9, 2016

    Micro-sandblasting is used to clean the blade of the Axe.

  • Jan. 30, 2017

    Detailed drawing of the axe. Illustration: Vegard Vike, KHM/UiO.

  • Dec. 15, 2016

    A reconstruction showing the main design features of the axe. Illustration: Vegard Vike, KHM/UiO.

  • Dec. 9, 2016
    X-ray photograph of the axe. The thickening of the blade behind the cutting-edge can be seen and a weld line at the insertion of the steel bit. The pins fastening the brass banding to the haft are also visible. X-ray photograph: Vegard Vike, Museum of Cultural History, UiO.
  • Jan. 30, 2017

    Broadaxe from Langeid. Museum number C58882/4.

  • Jan. 30, 2017

    Broadaxe from Langeid. Museum number C58882/4.

  • Dec. 15, 2016

    The sword from grave 8 at Langeid in Setesdal valley. It is 91 cm long, almost completely preserved. Only a few centimetres are missing from the tip of the blade. Museum number C58882/3.

  • Feb. 1, 2017

    Madonna sculpture from Lisleherad, Telemark (C.8737). Photo: Åse Kari Hammer/Museum of Cultural History

  • Feb. 9, 2017

    Figure 1: The Iconic animal head post the ‘Academic’s fine details, is preserved thanks to advanced preservation techniques. Photo: Museum of Cultural History, UiO / Kirsten Helgeland.

  • Dec. 15, 2016

    Close-up photo of the pommel. Inlays of gold wire makes up the central line in each symbol. The gold is framed by a copper wire that is now black. All the intermediate surfaces have been filled in with parallel silver wires. At the top a hand holding a cross is visible. Photo: Vegard Vike, Museum of Cultural History, UiO.

  • Feb. 9, 2017

    Figure 2: The animal head post the ‘Carolingian’, before treatment (left) and after treatment (right) with alum. The blurring of surface carving is obvious. Photo: Museum of Cultural History, UiO / Kirsten Helgeland (right).

  • Dec. 16, 2016

    Madonna sculpture before the overpainting was removed, from an old glass plate negative (approx. 1930). Photo: Museum of Cultural History.

  • Feb. 1, 2017

    Bridal lad/bridal hat from Tinn in Telemark. Norwegian Museum of Cultural History (NF.1991-0337A). Photo: Haakon Michael Harriss/Norwegian Museum of Cultural History (downloaded from DigitaltMuseum.no).

  • Dec. 15, 2016

    On X-ray it is possible to glimpse rows of signs along the sword blade, but these are very unclear and difficult to define. X-ray photo: Vegard Vike, Museum of Cultural History, UiO.

  • Feb. 9, 2017

    Figure 3: Professor Gabriel Gustafson (1853-1915), Head of the Museum of National Antiquities and leader of the Oseberg excavations. Photo: Museum of Cultural History.

  • Feb. 9, 2017

    Figure 4: The ‘Academic’, at home in its aquarium in the Oseberg salon, Historic Museum, around 1912.  Photo: Museum of Cultural History.

  • Dec. 15, 2016

    In the midst of the conservation process. The precious metal surface of the hilt is being uncovered with a hammer and micro-chisel.

  • Dec. 16, 2016

    Madonna with overpainting removed in the same style as the ‘new’ crown/lad. Photo: Eivind Bratlie/Museum of Cultural History.

  • Dec. 15, 2016

    A detail from the side of the pommel during conservation.

  • Feb. 9, 2017

    Figure 5: The animal head post the ‘Baroque master's last', was destroyed in the 1940s when its tank sprung a leak. Now it is packed away in the museum stores. Photo: Museum of Cultural History.

  • Dec. 16, 2016

    Madonna sculpture from Lisleherad, Telemark.

  • Dec. 15, 2016

    The conservator Vegard Vike working on uncovering the hilt of the Langeid Sword.

  • Feb. 9, 2017

    Figure 6: Woodcarver Jørgen Eriksen‘s copy of  the ‘Baroque master’s last‘ dragon head.  He worked for only two years, between 1906 and 1908 making copies of the Oseberg finds. Photo: Museum of Cultural History.